Archive for the ‘Resources’ Category

YALSA’s Cultural Competencies Task Force interviews Patrick Jones, retired young adult services guru, author, speaker, winner of the 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Library Association and Catholic Library Association, and pro wrestling enthusiast. Patrick was a teen librarian for 20 years, and continues to be an advocate for teens and teen services. This podcast gives an overview of how best to reach out and serve young adults in juvenile correctional facilities and provides advice to librarians new to outreach to prisons:

http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/2015/05/07/podcast-with-patrick-jones-serving-incarcerated-youth/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+feedburner%2Fyalsa+%28YALSA+Blog%29

Resources:

Librarians Serving Youth in Custody: http://www.youthlibraries.org/.

The Beat Within: A Publication of Writing and Art from the Inside:http://www.thebeatwithin.org/.

Contra Costa Times article about librarian Amy Cheney:http://www.contracostatimes.com/breaking-news/ci_27691434/alameda-county-librarian-connects-incarcerated-youths-lesser-known.

Literacy for Incarcerated Teens: http://www.literacyforincarceratedteens.org/.

Reaching Out to Young Adults in Jail, p.16:http://yalsa.ala.org/yals/yalsarchive/volume3/3n1_fall2004.pdf

School Library Journal article about literacy for incarcerated teens:http://www.slj.com/2014/09/literacy/literacy-for-incarcerated-teens/#_

Listen to this terrific  presentation about why we need diverse books, in case you don’t already know, or want to feel validated and reinspired:

hhttp://www.eventscribe.com/2015/ALA-Midwinter/assets/audio-flash/171186/launcher.asp?AssetID=43021

Check out this great 38 minute informational video from Ryan Dowd of Hesed House: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYiEEhhrFh4&feature=youtu.be

By  , published in School Library Journal on February 18, 2015

As librarians who work with incarcerated and underserved teens and see the misinformation in the world about the kids we serve, the In the Margins committee realized a book list and award for adults who work in the margins and understand issues of social justice and inequity was needed. To this end, the In the Margins Social Justice/Advocacy Book Award was created this year. We are enlivened to announce the formation of this award and the inaugural winner.

just mercyThe In the Margins committee recognizes Bryan Stevenson for his tremendous book Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption (Spiegel & Grau).

The decision wasn’t easy. Our debate raged primarily between Stevenson’s title and Nell Bernstein’s Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison (New Press). Just Mercy carried the day (most likely) because of its accessibility and passion. The title is winning tons of awards, and we are happy to be in the good company of his work.

In addition to the winning title, the committee has also provided the other nominations, with annotations. We hope that you will read one or all of these books to increase, deepen, affirm, and clarify your understanding of the issues facing poor people of color in America.

In the Margins Advocacy Nominations

BERNSTEIN, Nell. Burning Down the House: The End of Juvenile Prison. New Press. June 2013. 384p. Tr $26.95. ISBN 9781595589569.

Burning down the houseNell Bernstein doesn’t talk the usual talk about the youth involved with the juvenile justice system. Instead, she focuses on societal disregard and epistemic failure to educate and rehabilitate youth in custody. In a country that leads the world in juvenile arrest, this epic failure draws incarcerated youth deeper into the world of crime. Recent studies on offenders have revealed that those who are locked up as youth are twice as likely to be locked up as adults compared to those given alternative choices. Burning Down the House does for children what Michele Alexander’s The New Jim Crow (New Press, 2012) has done for adults: brings this issue to national attention. Bernstein outlines the history of juvenile “reform” schools, the rise and fall of the rehabilitative model, and the reality of what happens behind bars to already traumatized teens: further physical, sexual, and mental abuse. She takes a look at solitary confinement practices, “therapeutic prisons,” and juvenile reentry. Using solid teen developmental theory and research, United Nations findings, and trauma informed care, there is no book that so articulately sets forth the argument against the imprisonment of children. A passionate advocate for children, Bernstein highlights teens’ voices and experiences throughout the book, which adds and insight to the statistics.

GOFFMAN, Alice. On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City. University of Chicago Press. May 2014. 288p. Tr $25.00. ISBN 9780226136714. pap $16.00. ISBN 9781250065667.

on the runFor six years, Goffman emerged herself into the subculture and lives of families residing in a poor black inner city Philadelphia neighborhood. Goffman’s commitment to the integrity of the people involved shows throughout the work as she reveals the desperation, fear, and resourcefulness of a community trying to survive within a culture of surveillance. Children’s games are centered on running and hiding from the police; janitors and other hospital employees end up treating serious wounds, including gunshot wounds, on the street.  Small business arise to assist people who need identification (if you don’t understand why people don’t go to the DMV or the hospital, you will by the time you finish this book). Entire families and some individuals within families are able to escape lives free from police surveillance, custody and control by virtually living their lives inside their homes. Written in clear concise language with scrupulous reporting, readers are able to see through the eyes and experiences of Goffman—a young middle class white college student and daughter of two prominent sociologists—the unfair and disproportional treatment of people by police. Based on the evidence presented in this investigative sociological report, there’s not much more to say about the separate and unequal treatment of people by police and the courts.

HART, Carl.  High Price: A Neuroscientist’s Journey of Self Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society. HarperCollins. June 2013. 352p. Tr $26.99. ISBN 9780062015884. pap. $15.99. ISBN 9780062015891.

high priceHart was the only black person in America to receive his PhD in neuroscience in 1996.  Hart bares his life and soul as well as his scientific findings in an eye-opening book about drug addiction and society, showing how stereotypes and fear, hysteria and racism, have informed our drug policies and enforcements—not the reality of drug addiction. In fact, it is the policies and enforcements that have destroyed families, lives, and communities far beyond what any drug could do. Coming from a background filled with domestic violence, poverty, and “the streets,” Hart examines his life, work and science in deeply honest, profoundly insightful and provocative ways. Calling for education based on science, and then decriminalization of all drugs, he advocates for a drug policy based on fact, not fiction. Reading this book will forever impact and change what you think you know about drugs and society.

HOBBS, Jeff. The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace. Scribner. Sept. 2014. 416p. Tr $27.00. ISBN 9781476731902.

short and tragic lifeHobbs was Robert Peace’s roommate at Yale. After his murder, Hobbs was compelled to understand more deeply the facts of Peace’s life and the full scope of the circumstances that led to his death. Peace grew up in poverty in New Jersey with a hardworking mother and drug-dealing father, both of whom valued and encouraged his education. Peace was inherently and effortlessly brilliant, graduating from Yale University with a degree in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. Like the three doctors of The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream (Riverhead, 2003), Peace made it out of the ‘hood. Or did he? Unlike the three doctors, he was a rarity in his family and community to attain such levels of education. Several years later he was murdered in a basement apartment where he was selling marijuana. Peace’s life and death were impacted by race, poverty, and education; Hobbs brings these complex concepts into reality through the powerful narrative of the specifics of one young man’s life.

STEVENSON, Bryan. Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. Spiegel & Grau. Oct. 2014. 352p. Tr $28.00. ISBN 9780812994520.

Only a handful of countries condemn children to death row, and America is one of them. What is the one commonality of people on death row? The race of the victim: if the victim is white, the perpetrator is 11 times more likely to be condemned to die than if the victim was black. Stevenson was 23 years old, studying law at Harvard, and wondering why when he was called to an internship in Georgia where his first assignment was to deliver a message to a man living on death row. Face to face with this man, Stevenson realized his calling: representing the innocent, the inadequately defended, the children, the domestic abuse survivors, the mentally ill—the imprisoned. In heartbreaking and personal details, Stevenson interweaves real stories with statistics and his experiences fighting to change the injustices. Fast paced and relentless, Just Mercy reads like a Grisham novel, with short chapters featuring real people’s stories: children, youth and adults who have found themselves in the system since they were teens.

YAMINI, Omar. What’s Wrong With You! What You,Your Children, and Our Students Need to Know About My 15 Year Imprisonment From Age 20-35. Smashwords/The Proper Perception. January 2014. pap. $19.95. ISBN 9780991574605.

whats wrong with youYamini was 20 years old when he was sent to prison for being an accessory to a crime, and spent the next 15 years locked up in various institutions in Chicago. Life in prison is not about the fear of being physically hurt, he says, but the reality of “being kept, treated and controlled like an animal.” It’s the reality of losing human dignity and the struggle to maintain it amidst the chaos, boredom, insanity, humiliations, and degradations that make up life in prison. Hoping that teens who read his experiences will reconsider their behavior in order to avoid the same fate places the book in the realm of “scared straight,” yet the day to day details of a 15-year prison term and what it’s really like will have readers questioning the validity and purpose of locking anyone up.

ZEMAN, Marybeth. Tales of a Jailhouse Librarian: Challenging the Juvenile Justice System One Book at a Time. Vinegar Hill Press. Feb. 2014. pap. $15.99. ISBN 9780615953878.

jailhouse librarianZeman, a juvenile detention center transitional counselor, created a library book cart as a way to connect with incarcerated kids in New York state institutions. Short chapters alternate between Zeman’s life and observations of and interactions with the teens she serves. As she rolls her book cart up and down the hallways readers hear the voices of the kids asking for the “book lady.” Anyone looking for reasons why someone would want to work with teens in custody, or beginning a simple library, will find Zeman’s tale of personal fulfillment encouraging.

Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and Incarceration

When yet another Black boy is shot down or locked up, it’s a wake-up call to all of us to understand and challenge the systematically enforced racism that allows—in fact, ensures—this to happen. We are way past the crisis point. If you, your friends, or family members haven’t experienced the societal trauma of living in America being Black or Brown or poor, one of the many things you can do is to increase your awareness. If you have, the following selections can  provide hope and context on this dire situation.

lionheart1 Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and IncarcerationLionheart: Coming from Where I’m From by Rayshawn Wilson is my current top pick for youth and adults alike. Wilson grew up in Columbus, Ohio, knowing how to cook up a batch of crack, steal food from the grocery store in order to survive, and lie—all learned experiences due to his environment at birth. When he was six years old, his house was invaded by the police, guns drawn. He was put into the backseat of a police cruiser, terrified, watching as his crack-addicted mother was handcuffed and taken away. Thus began a journey that too many African American, Latino, and poor teens in this country have experienced: foster care, sexual abuse, and life on the streets. And for some, breaking into people’s homes and dealing drugs. “Crime was as constant as breathing and provided more promise than tomorrow,” Wilson writes.

After serving two years for a crime he did not commit, the young man became the first person in his family to graduate from college. How he got from his beginnings as a child of a single, drug-addicted mother (and fortunately, Wilson shows us a depth beyond that label) to multiple college degrees, among many other accomplishments, is stuff that will keep teens engaged and turning pages. Self-published, the book is well-written with a forward-moving narrative and just the right mixture of the young kid and teen action-filled years balanced with his later more adult transformations. There is too much type on the page and not enough white space, and I personally think the title and cover are a bit strange, but these are slight downsides of this terrific memoir.

just mercy Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and IncarcerationOnly a handful of countries condemn children to death row, and the United States is one of them. Most people are not aware that theone commonality of people on death row is the race of the victim. If the victim was white, the perpetrator is 11 times more likely to be condemned to die than if the victim was black. Unacceptable: black lives matter. In heartbreaking and personal detail, Bryan Stevenson’s book Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption interweaves real stories with these statistics and his fight to change these injustices. Stevenson was 23 years old, studying law at Harvard and wondering why, when he accepts an internship in Georgia, where his first assignment was to deliver a message to a man living on death row. This brought him face to face with what became his calling: representing the innocent, the inadequately defended, the children, the domestic abuse survivors, and the mentally ill—— the imprisoned. He writes specifically about the South — though he covers these topics at a national level in the book. It’s as much a story about Stevenson as it is about the many people of whom he writes.

Chapters either feature one complete narrative, such as the story of the Confederate loving guard who makes Stevenson strip search before he’s allowed to enter the facility or an entry that moves the overall narrative further at a fast pace. Included are stories of children, teens, and adults who have been in the system since they were teens, including the story of Walter as a through-line. Walter was at a barbeque with over 100 people at the time of the murder he was accused of committing, and spent more than six years on death row. This book is a standout choice for teens and adults, illuminating the big picture and personal details of the unjust experiences faced by too many black, brown, and poor people in the U.S.

robert peace Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and IncarcerationI can’t see many if any teens reading The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace, mainly because it’s written at a distance from the protagonist by Jeff Hobbs, Peace’s college roommate. Still, it’s a book that has stayed with me since I read it months ago, and felt it important enough to include here. Peace grew up in poverty in New Jersey with a hardworking mother and drug dealing father, both of whom valued and encouraged his education. Peace was inherently and effortlessly brilliant, graduating from Yale University with a major in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. Several years later he was murdered in a basement apartment where he was selling marijuana. NPR has chosen it as one of their top books of 2014. Shannon Rhoades, NPR’s Morning Edition staffer says, “Reading the book, you become witness to tremendous potential lost, and you’ll think about race, education and poverty in ways that perhaps you hadn’t before. It can make for excruciating reading at times—excruciating, yet essential.”

Let Me Live 195x300 Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and IncarcerationLet Me Live: Voices of Youth Incarcerated is an anthology of writings by youth from four different national lockdowns. It’s published by a volunteer organization in St. Paul, MN, Save the Kids. There is some good stuff in here. It’s simple to read, and black-and-white graphics created by young people are included. The poem titles are in nice hip hop–type style, and the voices are raw (no moralizing here!). Typed versions of each selection with mostly corrected spelling are displayed alongside a photocopy of the real piece each kid wrote. Overall, it’s real, authentic and relevant.

Here’s an example of a poem I liked which shows a lot of insight as to the pointlessness of prison:

“Time In Here” by Dion

It’s not different from the streets it seems
in there the colors is gray and green
in here I hear people talk smack
sometimes it makes me mad, and sometimes
it makes me wanna jap.
I hear foul language
I hear kids bein’ angry
and that makes me stay the same me.

While some are less insightful, the simplicity is important as it shows the immaturity of the youth.

“Sometimes” by Dominique

I’m in jail n’ it feel like hell. Ma don’t pick
up the phone sometimes I feel all alone
Sometimes I call on people but still I’m alone
Sometimes I feel right. Sometimes I feel
wrong.

Bottom line, these are the voices of incarcerated kids and we need to hear them. We need to read books written by and about people in the underground— review, purchase, and have them in our collections in order to serve our communities. And in so doing, perhaps we can make a dent in the profound and horrifying inequities and injustices in our so called democracy.

The reading list below includes not only the books mentioned above, but examples of essential books to read to increase awareness and become as educated as we can.

Reading Challenge: In the comments section, please suggest more titles that can inspire readers to do something about cycles of poverty, race, and incarceration.

ALEXANDER, Michelle. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New Press. 2012. 336p. pap. $19.95. ISBN 9781595586438.

To the End of June 199x300 Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and IncarcerationBEAM, ChrisTo the End of June: The Intimate Life of American Foster Care. Mariner Bks. 2014. 336p. pap. $12.67. ISBN 9780544103443.

BERNSTEIN, Nell. Burning Down the House: The End of Youth Prison. New Press. 2014. 319p. Tr $26.95. ISBN 9781595589569.

high price Books to Increase Awareness of the Cycles of Poverty, Race, and IncarcerationHART, Carl. High Price: A Neuroscientist’s Journey of Self Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society. Harper. 2013. 352p. Tr $26.99. ISBN 9780062015884; pap. $15.99. ISBN 9780062015891.

HOBBS, Jeff. The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace. Scribner. 2014. 416p. Tr $27. ISBN 9781476731902.

MAUER, Marc and Sabrina Jones. Race to Incarcerate: A Graphic Retelling. New Press. 2013. 128p. pap. $17.95. ISBN  9781595585417.

PARSELL, T.J. Fish: A Memoir of a Boy in a Man’s Prison. Da Capo Pr. 2007. 336p. pap. $12.00. ISBN 9780786720378

RIOS, Victor M. Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys. New York University Pr. 2011. 173p. pap. $24. ISBN 9780814776384.

SAVE THE KIDS. Let Me Live: Voices of Youth Incarcerated (Poetry Behind the Walls). Arissa Media Group. 2013. 138p. pap. $10.69. ISBN 9781936900220.

STEVENSON, Bryan. Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. Spiegel & Grau. 2014. 352p. Tr $28. ISBN 9780812994520.

TAIBBI, Matt. The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap. Spiegel & Grau. 2014. 448p. pap. $12.95.  ISBN 9780812983630.

TILTON, Jennifer. Dangerous or Endangered: Race and the Politics of Youth in Urban America. New York University Pr. 2010. 242p. pap. $27. ISBN 9780814783122.

WILSON, Rayshawn. Lionheart: Coming from Where I’m From. Legendary Publishing. 2014. 196p. pap. $15. ISBN 9780982786321.

Published originally in School Library Journal, Dec 16, 2014

Great article and good list of books – not really perfect for the teens I serve, but important to have handy. ~ Amy

By Erin E. Moulton at School Library Journal

SLJ1411w FT MetalHealths Bibliotherapy for Teens: Helpful Tips and Recommended Fiction

It’s been a quiet day at the reference desk at the rural public library where I work, but the hum begins to pick up as the afternoon wears on. Teens drift in, looking for books, movies, and video games. One of my regulars approaches me. He comes up to the desk once a month or so, and always for the same reason.

“Do you have any books on anxiety?” he asks.

I decide to skip the reference interview with him. The last time, it seemed to mute him and he ran.

“Sure let me show you,” I say, quickly heading toward the 600s. “Do you think any of these will be helpful?” There’s John Giacobello’s Everything You Need to Know About Anxiety and Panic Attacks, Lisa M. Schab’s The Anxiety Workbook for Teens, and Freaking Out: Real Life Stories of Anxiety, edited by Polly Wells.

“No,” he says, picking at the binding of the book nearest him.

“Can you give me any more details on what you might want?”

“Definitely not what I’m looking for,” he mutters as he disappears.

The next time he comes in, something is different. He makes eye contact. “Do you have any books on anxiety…Not information, but stories about anxiety? A novel?” he asks.

So he doesn’t want clinical information. He wants stories.

I go to the catalog, hoping to find one before I lose him. My search of the Novelist database, including the terms “realistic teen fiction” and “anxiety,” pulls up too many hits—and none seem quite right. The first has to do with superheroes. The next is about the “anxiety” of being in the popular group.

My friend starts turning away.

“Let’s have a look over here,” I say, heading to the teen space. I recently ordered a book with anxiety as a theme, and I know that the cover is blue. I scan the shelves. Blue, blue, blue. There it is—Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets by Evan Roskos. I’ve read it and know the context. I flip to the first page and point to the line: “I am a depressed, anxious kid.”

My friend takes it, then nods, turns, and slips away. For the moment, I feel triumphant.

THE STATISTICS ON MENTAL ILLNESS

This and other experiences I’ve had make me start thinking about teens, mental illness, and the potential of bibliotherapy. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH; 2012 data), approximately 2.2 million, or 9.1 percent, of U.S. adolescents ages 12 to 17 had at least one major depressive episode in the past year. Millions more endure other conditions.

While mental illness is clearly prevalent, a stigma persists. A recent article in Time, prompted by the suicide of actor Robin Williams, estimated that about 60 percent of those suffering from mental illness don’t seek assistance. Reading is not a replacement for professional therapy. But surely, the right books can help.

The next week, I have a teen shadowing me for an economics class assignment. She tells me that she might ask a lot of questions, that her mind works differently, and that she has Asperger’s syndrome.

She also tells me that someday she will write a book about having Asperger’s—but not now, because she isn’t allowed to shout “loud and proud” about her condition. Her parents warned her not to tell her peers.

This may be for her own protection. Kids with mental illness—kids with pills—can be confronted by others trying to buy or steal them. They can also be targets of ridicule.

She admits that her situation can be frustrating, isolating—like a dirty secret. I ask if she has readRogue by Lyn Miller-Lachmann and notice that she checks it out before leaving the library.

Several days later, teens gather for our library’s weekly movie making club. One girl travels from three towns over to be there. I don’t know her very well, but I do know that she is in foster care. Sometimes she shows up with her therapist. Often, she seems to be in need of attention one moment and eager to be alone the next—turning away would-be friends with a cutting comment.

She settles in with the other kids who are sketching out ideas on neon card stock and talking. I overhear one make a joke about rape. “Hey, lay off it,” the girl says. “Some of us have to live with bad memories.” The group falls silent.

I want to help her, and consider retrieving the Department of Health and Human Services info book, or finding the number for a local mental health organization. But she has a therapist already. Furthermore, she isn’t asking me for that information. A book might provide some comfort, though I know I don’t have the context or the rapport to confidently hand her the right one. Perhaps Laurie Halse Anderson’s Speak, or Stephanie Kuehn’s Charm & Strange.

If the books are out in the open, maybe she would stumble upon a useful title on her own. I decide to create a display, starting off with a list of the 16 disorders under the term “Mental Illness” provided by the National Alliance of Mental Illness website. The conditions currently listed range from anxiety and autism spectrum disorders to eating disorders and schizophrenia. Then I dig for teen novels related to these conditions. Many of my favorite authors are among them: Matthew Quick, Ellen Hopkins, Benjamin Alire Sáenz.

The next afternoon, all but two of the eight titles are gone. Were they taken by teens looking for themselves in the pages—or others seeking to recognize peers, friends, or family members? Did Laurie Halse Anderson’s Wintergirls end up with someone struggling with anorexia? Did Hilary T. Smith’s Wild Awake find its way into the hands of someone feeling manic? Is Matthew Quick’s Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock being read by someone who had been abused?

THE PROMISE OF BIBLIOTHERAPY

The statistics about teens and mental illness are staggering. In addition to the 2.2 million who experienced depression within the past 12 months, according to the NIMH data, 25.1 percent of youth from ages 12 to 17 experienced some sort of anxiety within the same time period, whether it was generalized, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), agoraphobia, or something else. Nine percent had attention deficit disorder, and two percent had an eating disorder. The list goes on.

Can reading help significantly? To my mind, as both a librarian and a writer, the answer is a resounding yes. Fiction has a special magic to it—the ability to weave a world outside reality. To simulate experiences and outcomes. For someone who feels alone, a friend awaits within the pages—someone who says, “Yes, I’ve been there. Have gone through that. Am suffering along with you.”

Is my perspective on the power of bibliotherapy accurate? To find out, I went searching, talked to some people, and discovered promising research on the topic.

“We use books with parents and kids to promote the feeling that their problems are not isolated problems,” says Lisa Estivill, the director of Adolescent Therapeutic Education and After School Services at Washington County (VT) Mental Health Services. “Many of our kids have read books in class and with their clinicians to help them better contextualize their disabilities and/or validate their experience.”

While professionals agree that bibliotherapy isn’t a mainstream methodology or a replacement for professional therapy, it can be a beneficial part of the therapeutic process.

“Bibliotherapy can serve as an unobtrusive, non-threatening medium to help adolescents relieve their stress and increase their coping skills,” write Heidi L. Tussing and Deborah P. Valentine in their 2001 article “Helping Adolescents Cope with the Mental Illness of a Parent through Bibliotherapy,” published in Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal. Tussing and Valentine write: “They (readers) gain insight, on the problem-solving and coping skills of the characters, subsequently applying this learning to their own lives.”

Books offering insights into a peer’s condition are also beneficial, says David Rice, children, youth, and family services education coordinator at the Ch.O.I.C.E (Changing Our Ideas Concerning Education) Academy, an integrated transitional mental health facility and education center in Vermont. Rice cites an experience he had when his students read Anything But Typical by Nora Raleigh Baskin, a novel about a character who has Asperger’s syndrome. “Only one of the boys in class had Asperger’s, but the most profound aspect of the experience was what the other students learned about how his mind works, and how he corroborated with his peers what the character was feeling,” Rice says.

In Rice’s opinion, such experiences of bibliotherapy have far-reaching impact. “Though I have no concrete evidence of the effectiveness of bibliotherapy, through student responses and reactions, I would say it is not only helpful, but could also be profound,” he says.

FINDING THE RIGHT STORY

“Mental illness” is a vast term, and yet titles of all kinds are often placed in this catch-all category, which creates a challenge in retrieving the right book for a patron. Reading a book about a protagonist with an eating disorder is very different than reading one about someone with schizophrenia. Additionally, writers often steer clear of diagnostic terms.

On the one hand, I understand that not everyone fits into a label. As a creative writer, I hate labels. But as a librarian, I want to find the right book. A label, a category, would help.

Inspired by my book display, I set about creating a book list of realistic teen fiction with representation of mental illness organized by disorder. I have verified the category placement by MARC records, jacket copies, or, when those were unclear, confirmation by the authors themselves.

While I’m not claiming that books can be a substitute for therapy, within the right context, I believe they can serve as valuable touchstones, conversation starters, and companions. It is my hope that this list can help librarians, teachers, therapists, and teens better identify books to suit their specific needs. So that everyone might find a Dr. Bird—a companion on an often too solitary road.


Moulton Erin E Contrib Web Bibliotherapy for Teens: Helpful Tips and Recommended FictionErin E. Moulton is a teen librarian at the Derry (NH) Public Library and author ofChasing the Milky Way (Penguin Random House, 2014).

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SLJ1411w FT MetalHealth SB1 Bibliotherapy for Teens: Helpful Tips and Recommended Fiction

REALISTIC TEEN FICTION AND MENTAL HEALTH
A BOOK LIST

ANXIETY DISORDER

Caletti, Deb. The Nature of Jade (S. & S., 2007)

Baskin, Nora Raleigh. Anything but Typical (S. & S., 2009)

Colasanti, Susane. Waiting for You (Viking, 2009)

Herbach, Geoff. Stupid Fast (Sourcebooks Fire, 2011)

*Roskos, Evan. Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets (Houghton Harcourt, 2013)

Schutz, Samantha. I Don’t Want to Be Crazy (Scholastic, 2006)

*also depression

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

Choldenko, Gennifer. Al Capone Does My Shirts (Putnam, 2004)

Erskine, Kathryn. Mockingbird (Philomel, 2010)

Franklin, Emily, and Halpin, Brendan. The Half-Life of Planets (Hyperion, 2010)

Haddon, Mark. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Doubleday, 2003)

Jacobs, Evan. Screaming Quietly (Saddleback, 2013)

Kelly, Tara. Harmonic Feedback. (Holt, 2010)

Lyn Miller-Lachmann. Rogue (Nancy Paulsen, 2013)

Miller, Ashley Edward. Colin Fischer (Penguin, 2012)

Roy, Jennifer. Mindblind (Marshall Cavendish, 2010)

Stork, Francisco X. Marcelo in the Real World (Scholastic, 2009)

ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER (ADD)/ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD)

Costa, T.L. Playing Tyler (Strange Chemistry, 2013)

Page, Katherine Hall. Club Meds (Simon Pulse, 2006)

Rue, Nancy. Motorcycles, Sushi and One Strange Book (Zonderkidz, 2010)

BIPOLAR DISORDER

Hopkins, Ellen. Impulse (Simon Pulse, 2007)

Niven, Jennifer. All the Bright Places (Knopf, 2015)

Reed, Amy. Crazy (Simon Pulse, 2012)

Polsky, Sara. This Is How I Find Her (Albert Whitman, 2013)

Sones, Sonya. Stop Pretending: What Happened When My Big Sister Went Crazy (HarperCollins, 1999)

Smith, Hilary T. Wild Awake (HarperCollins, 2013)

Wilson, Jacqueline. The Illustrated Mum (Delacorte, 2005)

Wunder, Wendy. Museum of Intangible Things (Penguin, 2014)

SLJ1411w FT MetalHealth SB2 Bibliotherapy for Teens: Helpful Tips and Recommended Fiction

DEPRESSION

Asher, Jay. Thirteen Reasons Why (Penguin, 2007)

Cardi, Annie. The Chance You Won’t Return (Candlewick, 2014)

Draper, Sharon M. “Hazlewood High Trilogy” (S. & S.)

Ford, Michael Thomas. Suicide Notes (Harpercollins, 2008)

Green, John, and Levithan, David. Will Grayson, Will Grayson (Dutton, 2010)

Halpern, Julie. Get Well Soon (Feiwel and Friends, 2007)

Hubbard, Jennifer R. Try Not to Breathe (Viking, 2012)

Jenkins, A.M. Damage (HarperCollins, 2001)

Jones, Traci L. Silhouetted by the Blue (FSG, 2011)

McNamara, Amy. Lovely, Dark and Deep (S. & S., 2012)

*Quick, Matthew. Sorta Like a Rock Star (Little, Brown, 2010)

Sales, Leila. This Song Will Save Your Life (FSG, 2013)

Schumacher, Julie. Black Box (Delacorte, 2008)

Vizzini, Ned. It’s Kind of a Funny Story (Hyperion, 2007)

Wolitzer, Meg. Belzhar (Dutton, 2014)

*also PTSD and autism

DISSOCIATIVE DISORDER

Cusick, John M. Girl Parts (Candlewick, 2010)

*Hopkins, Ellen. Identical (S. & S., 2008)

Leno, Katrina. The Half Life of Molly Pierce (HarperCollins, 2014)

*also eating disorders

DUAL DIAGNOSIS: MENTAL ILLNESS AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Sáenz, Benjamin Alire. Last Night I Sang to the Monster (Cinco Puntos, 2009)

*PTSD and alcoholism

EATING DISORDERS

Anderson, Laurie Halse. Wintergirls (Viking, 2009)

Anonymous. Letting Ana Go (Simon Pulse, 2013)

Bell, Julia. Massive (Young Picador, 2003)

Colbert, Brandy. Pointe (Putnam, 2014)

Friedman, Robin. Nothing (Flux, 2008)

Hopkins, Ellen. Perfect (S. & S., 2011)

Jaden, Denise. Never Enough (Simon Pulse, 2012)

Kaslik, Ibi. Skinny (Walker, 2006)

Littman, Sarah Darer. Purge (Scholastic, 2009)

Metzger, Lois. A Trick of the Light (HarperCollins, 2013)

Reed, Amy. Clean (Simon Pulse, 2011)

Shahan, Sherry. Skin and Bones (Albert Whitman, 2014)

Vrettos, Adrienne Maria. Skin (S. & S., 2006)

SLJ1411w FT MetalHealth SB3 Bibliotherapy for Teens: Helpful Tips and Recommended Fiction

OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD)

Ayarbe, Heidi. Compulsion (HarperCollins, 2011)

Chappell, Crissa-Jean. Total Constant Order (HarperCollins, 2007)

Harrar, George. Not as Crazy as I Seem (Houghton Mifflin, 2003)

Haydu, Corey Ann. OCD Love Story (Simon Pulse, 2013)

Hopkins, Ellen. Fallout (S. & S., 2010)

Karo, Aaron. Lexapros and Cons (FSG, 2012)

McGovern, Cammie. Say What You Will (HarperCollins, 2014)

Vaughn, Lauren Roedy. OCD, the Dude, and Me (Dial, 2013)

Wilson, Rachel. Don’t Touch (HarperCollins, 2014)

POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD)

War and Death

Anderson, Laurie Halse. The Impossible Knife of Memory (Viking, 2014)

Avashti, Swati. Chasing Shadows (Knopf, 2013)

Doller, Trish. Something Like Normal (Bloomsbury, 2012)

Herbach, Geoff. “Reinstein Trilogy” (Sourcebooks Fire)

Morgenroth, Kate. Echo (S. & S., 2007)

Quick, Matthew. Boy21 (Little, Brown, 2012)

Reinhardt, Dana. The Things a Brother Knows (Random/Wendy Lamb, 2010)

Abuse/Assault

*King, A.S. Reality Boy (Little, Brown, 2013)

Kuehn, Stephanie. Charm & Strange (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2013)

**Kuehn, Stephanie. Complicit (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2014)

*Mesrobian, Carrie. Sex and Violence (Carolrhoda, 2013)

**Quick, Matthew. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock (Little, Brown, 2013)

Perry, Jolene. Stronger Than You Know (Albert Whitman, 2014)

***Rainfield, Cheryl. Scars (WestSide, 2010)

Rainfield, Cheryl. Stained (Houghton Harcourt, 2013)

*also anxiety

**also depression

***includes self-harm/injury

SCHIZOPHRENIA

Averett, Edward. Cameron and the Girls (Clarion, 2013)

Bock, Caroline. Before My Eyes (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2014)

*de la Peña, Matt. I Will Save You (Delacorte, 2010)

James, Brian. Life Is But a Dream (Feiwel and Friends, 2012)

Schindler, Holly. A Blue So Dark (Flux, 2010)

Sheff, Nic. Schizo (Philomel, 2014)

Suma, Nova Ren. 17 & Gone (Dutton, 2013)

Trueman, Terry. Inside Out (HarperCollins, 2003)

*also PTSD

TOURETTE SYNDROME

Ayarbe, Heidi. Compromised (HarperCollins/HarperTeen, 2010)

Friesen, Jonathan. Jerk, California (Speak, 2008)

Note: I was unable to identify realistic teen fiction titles for borderline personality disorder, panic disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and schizoaffective disorder. Feel free to suggest titles in the comments section.

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Published in School Library Journal By Amy Cheney on October 14, 2014

As I read, and read, and read some more, I am always looking for the combination of elements that will make the book a hot read for reluctant readers and the kids I serve in the YA Underground.

The winning recipe, and I can’t say it enough, is this:

  1. A great cover.
  2. Lots of action and adventure—exterior action, not interior. Prose that shows, not tells.
  3. Relevant (and for my teens this means real).
  4. White space and a large type face.fromgodsmonster Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA Underground

I wrote about Pacc Butler’s book From God’s Monster to the Devil’s Angel: Life of a Chicago Gang Member (Createspace, 2014) as my top pick in the last YA Underground, but I lamented the cover. Well, he’s changed it. I love the new cover, and it will surely have the book flying off the shelves.

Runaway Thoughts, an anthology of kids writing about the pain of the prison system, also has an updated cover image.

anatomyofagirlgang Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA UndergroundMy current top pick is Anatomy of a Girl Gang (Arsenal Pulp, 2014), by Ashley Little, who has written for Orca Book Publishers. This title has action, relevancy, and a strong layout—all must-haves for reluctant readers—though it lacks a great cover. Raw, real, and written at a rapid pace, the book describes the formation and dissolution of a gang of teenagers, told from the multiple perspectives of the girls involved. It has a deserved starred review from Kirkus and is flying off the shelves in spite of the cover (it helps that the word gang is in the title).

In many instances, a book’s heft can be an intimidating barrier for reluctant readers; however, if it hits all the four points, it can still take off—genre can triumph over size. Kerry Sutherland, youth services librarian at Akron-Summit County Public Library in Northeast Ohio, recommends several 400-plus page books that will still appeal to reluctant readers. Sutherland has been involved with outreach to homeless and marginalized teens for over nine years, most currently with Safe Landing Youth Shelter for Girls.

old neighborhood Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA UndergroundThe first of Sutherland’s suggestions is The Old Neighborhood (Curbside Splendor, 2014), a debut novel from Chicago Tribune writer Bill Hillman. Having grown up on Chicago’s South Side, teenage Joe is aware of the dangers of drugs and gangs, but he also feels a deep connection to his neighborhood. He also knows that the secrets that bind him to his family and friends can be more powerful than his sense of right and wrong. This coming-of-age novel gets down and dirty, revealing hard truths about the challenges of attempting to both stay loyal to loved ones and obey the law on the Chicago streets.

rubybetweenthecracks Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA UndergroundSutherland’s second recommendation is P.D. Workman’s Ruby: Between the Cracks: Vol. 1 (Workman, 2014). The title character is a young teen in foster care who is sexually involved with her case worker, one of many relationships she initiates with adult men. Taken from her parents because of suspected abuse, she wanders aimlessly in pursuit of freedom while in desperate need of emotional security. Ruby has super dense type, but fans of Ellen Hopkins’s books will love the soap opera that is Ruby’s troubled life, including pregnancies, gang and drug involvement, and post-traumatic stress issues.

emergeboxedset Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA UndergroundOn the other extreme, there are super short, full-color books. Saddleback’s “Emerge” boxed sets, part of the publisher’s Teen Emergent Reading Libraries TERL, are ideal for my adolescents who read at a lower level. I always have quite a few preschool reading–level teens, and there’s not a lot out there for them. Forty-eight pages each, with a count of around 500 words, these books are thetest Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA Undergroundsimple, personal, and concrete, without complex themes and abstractions. Some of the photos feel a little clean cut and young for my crowd, but they still work. Eric, a PreK-level reader, tried P.J. Gray’s The Test (2014), a book in which a pregnancy test prompts a girl to look back on her relationship with her boyfriend. Eric said it was the first book he ever read and that “It was stuff I be doing. First they got along, then they didn’t, then they did again,” proving that subject matter that resonates with teens can be a surefire draw.

standemerge Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA UndergroundOf the five genres covered in the sets, the ones that work for my urban teens are realistic fiction and history/culture.The sports—mostly, not all—are activities that my teens don’t engage in, such as swimming and skateboarding. Action/adventure books includes titles in which characters get lost in the winter wilderness—again, stuff that my teens aren’t involved in (I’m based in California) and that therefore don’t fill the relevancy requirement. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to purchase titles individually in order to customize what will work with your students. Saddleback told SLJ that exposing kids to several different genres with different demographics actually leads to a higher level of engagement. Saddleback also mentioned they have incorporated nonfiction into every genre as well, to bring realism to the grouping. However, for my purposes and for kids who do like picture books they can relate to, I wish I could purchase simply the ones I want and not the entire set.

homelessatage13 Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA Underground

Anthony D. Ross’s Homeless at Age 13 to a College Graduate (Step One, 2014) has the page count necessary for a low level reader, but the author makes a mistake common to self-published writers: a bad cover photo. The curlicue font only makes things worse. However, the book itself is important and relevant to virtually all my teens, as would be any memoir of an individual thriving in spite of horrendous circumstances. The writing is decent and moves at a fast clip, though the book isn’t action packed.  Ross is up front about the obstacles he faced (lack of food, neglect, abuse), there mainly  a positive thread running through the book, with Ross emphasizing his accomplishments.

anthonywhyte Relevancy Trumps All for Reluctant Readers | YA Underground

I met Anthony Whyte, an Essence best-selling author and founder of Augustus Publishing and Street Literature Review Magazine: The Voice of Hip Hop Literature, while attending BookExpo America earlier this year. Had the conference been more diverse, he might have been mobbed. Due to popular demand, Whyte has begun writing for teens with Thin Line: A Child’s Eyes Never Lie (Augustus, 2013). The opening action sequence sets the stage for a mystery—11-year-old Shareef’s best friend and her family are gunned down. Why? The action slows way down to explain, the narrative becomes repetitive, and action is substituted for internal obsessions and stressors. The young protagonist uses words such as aplomb and discrepancy and freely walks into the crime scene several times using a hidden key—these are just a few of unbelievable aspects. Still, this one may satisfy the street lit genre crave, even though it’s a tamed down version without sex or real action.

Thin Line may be one of these titles that works for kids but not for me. A book like this is challenging for me to get through: the repetitions, contradictory information, unbelievable characters or settings and some of the same old, same old—I keep putting the book down because I am bored, bored, bored. Yet for my kids, many of whom have special processing issues (for instance, they may be designated as special ed or may have  ADHD or PTSD), relevancy trumps everything. Further, the repetition that so frustrates me is what helps them understand the narrative.

Featured titles:

BUTLER, Pacc. From God’s Monster to the Devil’s Angel: Life of a Chicago Gang Member. CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2014.  162p. $12.99. 9781494771669.

FRIEDMAN, Amy and Kalliope Panatiotakos, eds. Venice High School Students. Runaway Thoughts: The Pain of the Prison System Anthology. 2014. 183p. pp. $20. ISBN 9781495113598.

GRAY, P.J. The Test. Emerge Boxed Set, TERL Level 1. Saddleback Publishing, 2014. 20 titles. $449.95. ISBN 9781622508662.

HIGGINS, M.G. Boy Soldier. Saddleback, 2014. 48p. Sold in sets: Emerge History/Culture 9781622508105.

HIGGINS, M.G. Stand. Saddleback, 2014. 48p. Sold in sets: Emerge Sports 9781622508020.

HILLMANN, Bill. The Old Neighborhood: A Novel. Curbside Splendor, 2014. 500p. $ 15.95. 978-1940430003

LITTLE, Ashley. Anatomy of a Girl Gang. Arsenal Pulp Press, 2014. 254p. $13.68 978-1551525297.

ROSS, Anthony. Homeless at Age 13 to a College Graduate: An Autobiography. Step One Publishing, 2014. 96p. $8.99.  978-0991322435.

WHYTE, Anthony. Thin Line: A Child’s Eyes Never Lie. Augustus Publishing, 2013. 224p.  $14.95. 9780982541524.

WORKMAN, P.D. Ruby Between the Cracks #1. Workman, 2014. 484p. $17.75. 9780992153953.

As promised, here is the guest post by Greg. I loved having him at the hall. I can’t find his newest book Pirates on the shelves in the units- that means the kids have it in their rooms and are reading it. If you want to have him come speak to your youth, contact him through his website http://about.me/greg_cummings – (He currently lives in NY). Here is his blog: http://talesfromtherift.blogspot.com

And here is his post:

It’s a scorching, dry Saturday morning in California. Another rainless summer has turned the hills above San Leandro yellowish-gray. My taxi turns off a serpentine drive into an empty parking lot.

Embedded in the hillside, the Alameda Juvenile Justice Center is a vast, rectangular three-story construction, built with beige cinder blocks that blend in well with its surroundings. There’s no one in sight.

After instructing my taxi driver to return in 90 minutes, I activate the intercom next to the weekend entrUnknown-1ance. “Who is it?” asks a female voice.

“Greg Cummings. I’m the author giving a talk to Unit 4 today.”

“Who?”

“Greg Cummings. Amy Cheney arranged my visit…”

“Hang on a minute hun.”

While I wait for clearance into the prison, Mountain Mike’s escape story comes to mind.

When Mountain Mike escaped  a minimum-security federal correctional facility called William Head on Vancouver Island, he fashioned a raft from a coffin used in the prison’s amateur theatre production of Dracula, then paddled out across the Juan de Fuca Straits towards the Canadian mainland.

The coffin disintegrated and Mike sank to the bottom of the cold straights. “I was sure I was a goner,” he recalled, “but then a divine light beaconed me upward imagesagain. And then I found the strength to resurface and swim ashore.” He had a couple of weeks of freedom before the Mounties caught up with him.

I heard about Mountain Mike from one of his fellow inmates. It was October 1983, and I had just watched a performance of Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by William Head on Stage (WHoS), an inmate-run prison theatre company – the only one in Canada that invites the public into the prison to see their shows.   I was struck by the force of the cast’s performances, playing to a packed house, unbound by their incarceration. I had never seen such savage intensity in the eyes of actors. (more…)

Lost for Life: Juvenile Murder

Posted: September 15, 2014 in Resources

In the United States, more than 2,500 individuals are serving life-without-parole sentences for crimes they committed when they were 17 years old or younger. A powerful new documentary, “Lost for Life,” tells the stories of these individuals, their families and the families of the victims. The film is the result of writer-director-producer Joshua Rofé’s intensive efforts over four years.

“Lost for Life” — an official selection of five major U.S. Film Festivals, a ratings powerhouse for the BBC in the U.K., and a title coming to television in 57 countries (including Lifetime Movie Network in the U.S.) — will be available in the U.S. on iTunes.  Produced by Ted Leonsis, Rick Allen, Mark Jonathan Harris, Peter Landesman and executive producers Scott Budnick and Ari Silber, “Lost for Life” highlights four stories of homicide and the resulting life sentences for the teenage offenders.

Veteran documentary filmmaker Harris, who claimed Oscars for “Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport” and “The Redwoods,” collaborated with Rofé as a mentor on the project. In fact, the two worked so well together, they are now in production on their next documentary, “Swift Current,” about the impact of sexual abuse.

“I would not have ended up with the film we ended up with if not for Mark pretty much showing me how to be a director,” Rofé told Indiewire.

I loved this film.

Trailer

http://www.indiewire.com/article/heres-how-lost-for-life-a-powerful-new-documentary-about-juvenile-murder-came-together-20140718

By Amy Cheney

  • Discard ALL old, funky, boring, non-kid-friendly books in the facility. Old, funky, irrelevant books are a turn-off.  It is better to have no books at all than old and funky ones. This may seem counterintuitive, but it’s the first thing you need to do.
  • Talk with your administration about the importance of free and independent reading, and gain their support for creating a library of shared books.
  • Reach out to your local public library and partner with them on selecting and obtaining books, programming, librarian visits, grant writing, and book talking.
  • Partner with local bookstores: create a wish list for donors to buy books for your library. Bring in appropriate authors who visit bookstores.
  • Partner with local organizations to hold book drives on specific titles you want.  I partnered with the Girl Scouts for specific book requests and got all the Harry Potter, Wimpy Kid, James Patterson Maximum Ride, Rick Riordan, Goosebumps and many other basic kid-friendly items on the shelves.
  • Connect with Library Services for Youth in Custody (LSYC) and find out what people are doing across the country in providing library services.
  • Connect with Yalsa-lockdown  http://lists.ala.org/wws/info/yalsa-lockdown for questions about books and other issues.
  • Provide an abundance of books that kids can check out and bring back when they are done.
  • Create a stress-free honor system for lending books and materials.
  • Hire a consultant to assist you with selection development policies, purchasing books for 40% off, setting up your program and finding the best book choices for your facility. Image